How to Keep Things Private When Dealing with a Bail Bondsperson

When you are involved in a legal proceeding, even during the preliminary matters such as a bail hearing, you’ll probably find that your right of privacy has gotten nil. After all, any legal case is a matter of public record, and the courts can reasonably inquire into your personal affairs as long as it’s relevant to the case. Even your financial status is a matter of public record because the courts will determine the amount of your total bail based, in part, on your financial capacity. You don’t set a bail amount that is too low for a person who is well-off, because it won’t have the kind of teeth that would compel the defendant to attend his trial.

Even the fact that you have approached a bail bondsperson will be made of public record because it is one of the ways that a defendant is released on bail. Once your bail bondsman has put up a surety bond on your behalf, the court will note this in your record before granting you temporary release.

Does it seem like there is no right of privacy for any person involved in a criminal proceeding?

One thing you can do is ask your San Diego bail bondsman to keep private the details of your bond. Whether a relative or family member has agreed to become a cosigner on your behalf, or whether you have put up certain properties as security or collateral for your bail, these matters do not necessarily need to be made of public record.

The important thing is that you attend your trial when the bail bondsman in Santa Rosa pays your bail, and not skip bail. If you do this, no further inquiry needs to be made into the details of your bail bond or any other further details of your financial solvency. Unless these matters are relevant to the legal proceedings of the case you are involved in, you have a right to keep these matters private, and to be left alone regarding further inquiry into your personal financial status.